I hate to admit it but this man is far better than me…

by Didier Marlier on Thursday November 1st, 2012

I will share this “confidentially” with the 825 executives, consultants and academics reading this blog: I have started to write our second book with the help of the whole Enablers Community and more specifically with Dimitri Boisdet, my co-author on this.

This new book confirms what we claimed out of our professional observations in our previous book (Engaging Leadership) and the impact of leading through the levers of Ethos (Behavioural), Pathos (Emotional) and Logos (intellectual). The novelty is that we now add a whole context around these principles of Leadership. The context is the one of the emerging new societal, technological, generational wave which is emerging. We will study its impact for business leaders on strategy, organization and leadership. The book will be available in English, French and Portuguese.

As we were laying down the first foundations for our stream of thoughts, Dimitri showed me an article… It is not (Thank God!) an academic paper, nor a scientific experimentation. It is the fact of a skilled journalist reporting what he sees happening in the business and the impact that the Open Source Economy (which he calls “Generation Flux”, as we all have our egos and need to find a new name for the same phenomenon).

Rather than elaborating on it, I will let you read it and make your opinion… I hate to admit it, but Robert Safian has written something far better than I ever could have…

http://www.fastcompany.com/3001734/secrets-generation-flux

Have a good week all, Didier

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2 Responses to “I hate to admit it but this man is far better than me…”

  1. Thanks, Didier!

    For quite some time I’ve been thinking about the extreme complexity of the modern world and whether, despite impressive technological progress, the problems we face are maybe just too complicated for big, heavily hierarchical organizations.

    Safian’s article addresses this dilemma and provides several examples of how a different approach (disruptive, open and to some extent “revolutionary”) can be effective for navigating chaotic waters. It’s fascinating to see not only young technology mavens but also senior leaders in armed forces following this philosophy.

    Thanks for sharing and… all the best with your new book!

    Reply

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